Land of CYKE

Let your kids explore the Land of CYKE. They can play online games at Castle Fairhope, read stories at Pelican Point, or take a ride on the E. Motion Express.

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CYKE Today

A recent report indicated that early detection and intervention can lead to more positive results with a child that may have autism.

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Dr. Vincent Ho, a child and adult psychiatrist, writes about the problems all families face. A father of three, he knows it’s more than “by the book.”

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CYKE Forum

Visit the CYKE Forum and find out how other people have approached different problems. You’re not alone, hear what others have to say.

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CYKE Newsletter

Don’t miss an issue of the CYKE Newsletter. Keep up to date on the newest information available at CYKE and receive helpful suggestions.

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Many CYKE resources address different emotional problems throughout the life of your child. From anger problems to alcohol abuse prevention, check the CYKE Shop.

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Conditions Depression Picture

Anxiety - Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

"I couldn't do anything without rituals. They invaded every aspect of my life. Counting really bogged me down. I would wash my hair three times as opposed to once because three was a good luck number and one wasn't. It took me longer to read because I'd count the lines in a paragraph. When I set my alarm at night, I had to set it to a number that wouldn't add up to a 'bad' number."

"I knew the rituals didn't make sense, and I was deeply ashamed of them, but I couldn't seem to overcome them until I had therapy."

"Getting dressed in the morning was tough, because I had a routine, and if I didn't follow the routine, I'd get anxious and would have to get dressed again. I always worried that if I didn't do something, my parents were going to die. I'd have these terrible thoughts of harming my parents. That was completely irrational, but the thoughts triggered more anxiety and more senseless behavior. Because of the time I spent on rituals, I was unable to do a lot of things that were important to me."

People with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have persistent, upsetting thoughts (obsessions) and use rituals (compulsions) to control the anxiety these thoughts produce. Most of the time, the rituals end up controlling them.

For example, if people are obsessed with germs or dirt, they may develop a compulsion to wash their hands over and over again. If they develop an obsession with intruders, they may lock and relock their doors many times before going to bed. Being afraid of social embarrassment may prompt people with OCD to comb their hair compulsively in front of a mirror-sometimes they get "caught" in the mirror and can't move away from it. Performing such rituals is not pleasurable. At best, it produces temporary relief from the anxiety created by obsessive thoughts.

Other common rituals are a need to repeatedly check things, touch things (especially in a particular sequence), or count things. Some common obsessions include having frequent thoughts of violence and harming loved ones, persistently thinking about performing sexual acts the person dislikes, or having thoughts that are prohibited by religious beliefs. People with OCD may also be preoccupied with order and symmetry, have difficulty throwing things out (so they accumulate), or hoard unneeded items.

Healthy people also have rituals, such as checking to see if the stove is off several times before leaving the house. The difference is that people with OCD perform their rituals even though doing so interferes with daily life and they find the repetition distressing. Although most adults with OCD recognize that what they are doing is senseless, some adults and most children may not realize that their behavior is out of the ordinary.

OCD affects about 2.2 million American adults,1 and the problem can be accompanied by eating disorders,6 other anxiety disorders, or depression.2,4 It strikes men and women in roughly equal numbers and usually appears in childhood, adolescence, or early adulthood.2 One-third of adults with OCD develop symptoms as children, and research indicates that OCD might run in families.3

The course of the disease is quite varied. Symptoms may come and go, ease over time, or get worse. If OCD becomes severe, it can keep a person from working or carrying out normal responsibilities at home. People with OCD may try to help themselves by avoiding situations that trigger their obsessions, or they may use alcohol or drugs to calm themselves.4,5

OCD usually responds well to treatment with certain medications and/or exposure-based psychotherapy, in which people face situations that cause fear or anxiety and become less sensitive (desensitized) to them. NIMH is supporting research into new treatment approaches for people whose OCD does not respond well to the usual therapies. These approaches include combination and augmentation (add-on) treatments, as well as modern techniques such as deep brain stimulation.


About CYKE

What does "C-Y-K-E" stand for?

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CYKE Videos

See how the E. Motion Express helps the Monkey King control his anger in this 3-D animated video clip.

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CYKE Reviews

Read our E. Motion review of the “Lion King” to find out how you can use this movie to talk about loss and sadness with your child.

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Keep your own personal list of articles that you find most important. Join our CYKE Circle of premium members. Members receive discounts on products and services.

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CYKE Thoughts

Whether you’re dealing with the “Terrible Two’s” or “Teen Years” learn to pick and choose your battles.

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CYKE Favorites

Take a look at some of the books, TV shows, and movies that we have found useful and fun for children.

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