Land of CYKE

Let your kids explore the Land of CYKE. They can play online games at Castle Fairhope, read stories at Pelican Point, or take a ride on the E. Motion Express.

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CYKE Today

A recent report indicated that early detection and intervention can lead to more positive results with a child that may have autism.

CYKE Today Link

Dr. Vincent Ho, a child and adult psychiatrist, writes about the problems all families face. A father of three, he knows it’s more than “by the book.”

CYKE MD Blog Link
CYKE Forum

Visit the CYKE Forum and find out how other people have approached different problems. You’re not alone, hear what others have to say.

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CYKE Newsletter

Don’t miss an issue of the CYKE Newsletter. Keep up to date on the newest information available at CYKE and receive helpful suggestions.

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Many CYKE resources address different emotional problems throughout the life of your child. From anger problems to alcohol abuse prevention, check the CYKE Shop.

CYKE Shop Link
Conditions Depression Picture

Anxiety - Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

"I was raped when I was 25 years old. For a long time, I spoke about the rape as though it was something that happened to someone else. I was very aware that it had happened to me, but there was just no feeling."

"Then I started having flashbacks. They kind of came over me like a splash of water. I would be terrified. Suddenly I was reliving the rape. Every instant was startling. I wasn't aware of anything around me, I was in a bubble, just kind of floating. And it was scary. Having a flashback can wring you out."

"The rape happened the week before Thanksgiving, and I can't believe the anxiety and fear I feel every year around the anniversary date. It's as though I've seen a werewolf. I can't relax, can't sleep, don't want to be with anyone. I wonder whether I'll ever be free of this terrible problem."

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) develops after a terrifying ordeal that involved physical harm or the threat of physical harm. The person who develops PTSD may have been the one who was harmed, the harm may have happened to a loved one, or the person may have witnessed a harmful event that happened to loved ones or strangers.

PTSD was first brought to public attention in relation to war veterans, but it can result from a variety of traumatic incidents, such as mugging, rape, torture, being kidnapped or held captive, child abuse, car accidents, train wrecks, plane crashes, bombings, or natural disasters such as floods or earthquakes.

People with PTSD may startle easily, become emotionally numb (especially in relation to people with whom they used to be close), lose interest in things they used to enjoy, have trouble feeling affectionate, be irritable, become more aggressive, or even become violent. They avoid situations that remind them of the original incident, and anniversaries of the incident are often very difficult. PTSD symptoms seem to be worse if the event that triggered them was deliberately initiated by another person, as in a mugging or a kidnapping. Most people with PTSD repeatedly relive the trauma in their thoughts during the day and in nightmares when they sleep. These are called flashbacks. Flashbacks may consist of images, sounds, smells, or feelings, and are often triggered by ordinary occurrences, such as a door slamming or a car backfiring on the street. A person having a flashback may lose touch with reality and believe that the traumatic incident is happening all over again.

Not every traumatized person develops full-blown or even minor PTSD. Symptoms usually begin within 3 months of the incident but occasionally emerge years afterward. They must last more than a month to be considered PTSD. The course of the illness varies. Some people recover within 6 months, while others have symptoms that last much longer. In some people, the condition becomes chronic.

PTSD affects about 7.7 million American adults,1but it can occur at any age, including childhood.7 Women are more likely to develop PTSD than men,8 and there is some evidence that susceptibility to the disorder may run in families.9 PTSD is often accompanied by depression, substance abuse, or one or more of the other anxiety disorders.4

Certain kinds of medication and certain kinds of psychotherapy usually treat the symptoms of PTSD very effectively.


About CYKE

What does "C-Y-K-E" stand for?

About CYKE Link
CYKE Videos

See how the E. Motion Express helps the Monkey King control his anger in this 3-D animated video clip.

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CYKE Reviews

Read our E. Motion review of the “Lion King” to find out how you can use this movie to talk about loss and sadness with your child.

CYKE Reviews Link

Keep your own personal list of articles that you find most important. Join our CYKE Circle of premium members. Members receive discounts on products and services.

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CYKE Thoughts

Whether you’re dealing with the “Terrible Two’s” or “Teen Years” learn to pick and choose your battles.

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CYKE Favorites

Take a look at some of the books, TV shows, and movies that we have found useful and fun for children.

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